un-alone (au revoir)

Inspired by the phrase 'The muttering retreats' taken from 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T. S. Eliot.This now comprises a part of The Linkages Project and sothe day unfoldsinside my head the voicesat their easeat last the muttering retreatsand I am left alone brief momentsfalling like a firm blowof friendly solitude a … Continue reading un-alone (au revoir)

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This Music We Speak – Community Education Program

Over six weeks, commencing October, I'm going to be conducting a series of 6 workshops looking at the music in our speech and language. This is a new journey for me and I'm quite excited about it. A small group of language explorers! https://www.facebook.com/events/510768686341302/?notif_t=event_calendar_create&notif_id=1568530505767796

in blossom wild (a nature boy)

Inspired by the phrase 'Nature without check with original energy' taken from 'Song of Myself (Leaves of Grass)' by Walt Whitman.This now comprises a part of The Linkages Project I amthe nature boy creatureof flowers I amthe meadow dancingyellowof buttercups the growingwild the breezeunchecked blowing . . . blowingwith all the energyof a nature boy … Continue reading in blossom wild (a nature boy)

WAM Festival – Live Reading

I had the wonderful opportunity today to read to a Festival audience at WAM (Albury, New South Wales). Wonderful day. Wonderful audience. Wonderful fellow poets  (Jane Downing from Albury and Lachlan Brown from Wagga Wagga). Well done Albury City. I was also fortunate to have some of my reading recorded on an Oppo device. Gee, … Continue reading WAM Festival – Live Reading

chiming a little tune (of you)

Inspired by the phrase 'I think the Canterbury bells are playing little tunes', from the poem 'Madonna of the Evening Flowers' written by Amy Lowell. This now comprises a part of The Linkages Project I think that I heard the bellsas you brushed past playing little tinklingriffs as they touched oneinto the next one rang … Continue reading chiming a little tune (of you)

A Tribute to Frank Prem

Chelsea Owens, writer and poet has honored me with a tribute on her blog site.

Check out her site and her work if you have the chance.

Chelsea Ann Owens

Today I highlight the work of poet Frank Prem. I’ve enjoyed Frank’s poetry since my first days of blogging, and have been inspired to write responsestwice.

He possesses the unique gift of speaking in the voice of the objects he writes about; in movement and poignancy.

The following is my paltry attempt at mimicry, so you might all experience his style:

rain (in season)

I am a piece
of gray
a mist
a cloud

evaporate

I am a drip
a tear
from North Wind’s eye

don’t go
he cries

don’t
go

I am
the autumn rain

deluged

oh please
don’t go

©2019 Chelsea Owens

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whiteface (and rhyme)

Inspired by the phrase 'To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet' taken from 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T. S. Eliot.This now comprises a part of The Linkages Project mirror youand mirrorme take the pasteand slather make a moueamidthe lather smooth it downpat-a-cakeslap it slipintoa face-like shape mouldyour … Continue reading whiteface (and rhyme)

(PAD #052) breathe the breath

the magnoliahas come outto play posiesen promenade to catch my eyefromway over there drag me hereto inhalea breathof spring to drinkambrosia air the magnoliahas come out I reach a handto touchits skin ______________________________________________________________________________ Would you like to be notified about changes and developments in my writing world, new poetry collections and giveaways? Subscribe to my … Continue reading (PAD #052) breathe the breath

see then sing (then rise)

Inspired by the phrase 'And what I assume you shall assume' taken from 'Song of Myself (Leaves of Grass)' by Walt Whitman.This now comprises a part of The Linkages Project Iwill sing songsas thoughthe heavens sang I will openupmy voicewith greatconviction and Iwill singfor you croon my loveof beingunder the sky let you hearmy heartits … Continue reading see then sing (then rise)