ill air (and brittle beauty)

it is bitter
in the depths
of winter

the weather
seems to intensify
towards the end

and the chill
that begins
at fingertips
and toes
pries inward

the brittle cold
is a beautiful thing

attractive
and forbidding

as my home
is attractive
and forbidding

forbidden

for we have
it
here

the dread
contagion

oh
not right where I
am standing
no
but in the greater area
that I call
home

we are a jewel
of food growing
and wine

rolling hills
and striking
features

we are history
still able
to be shared

but
the doors
are closed

we
are trying
to sleep

six weeks
six months

six years

we don’t know

but
we must sleep
our thumbs pricked
with viral poison
until deemed
clean

kissed perhaps
by the vaccine prince

brought alive
as in
a fairy tale

but
I don’t think
it will work
like that

taint
is taint

and there will always be
now
a faint stain

a soft whiff
of ill-odour
about home

~

7 thoughts on “ill air (and brittle beauty)

      • It is here, too. My state has had a fairly low infection rate, but there was a news story this morning about a “super-spreader” event being planned (tent revival that will move from town to town). I can only hope that some public official has the authority and the brains to shut it down before it starts.

        Liked by 1 person

      • That’s truly horrifying to read, Liz. A recipe for prolonged disaster.

        Not a real surprise, though. There are a lot of freedom-fighters out there. Much I could say, but best not to.

        The pictures of Melbourne abandoned through curfew and lockdown are quite striking.

        In my Melbourne days an abiding memory is alighting from a commuter train at Flinders Street station and crossing the road as one of literally hundreds of workers.

        Very very strange imagery from there, now.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Army is involved, Liz, but the street patrols are still police province.

        Armed forces have been assisting with door to door checks of folk who are supposed to be self isolating and health matters – the aged care sector, among others.

        Certainly not a sight that could have been imagined until this point in time.

        Liked by 1 person

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